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Overnight Stables

Bring Your Own Horse!

Mount Rogers National Recreation Area and Virginia Highlands Horse Trails

 Mount Rogers National Recreation Area (NRA) manages approximately  200,000 acres of National Forest land near Mount Rogers.  The area  features four Congressionally designated wilderness areas; the Virginia  Creeper Trail; the Mount Rogers Scenic Byway which traverses over 50  miles offering views of the National Recreation Area and open rural  countryside; the 5000 acre Crest Zone featuring elevations over 4,000  feet, large rock formations, and a mixture of mountain balds and  spruce-fir forests; a herd of wild, free-ranging ponies; and the highest  elevated road in the state of Virginia leading to the summit of  Whitetop Mountain. The Virginia Highlands Horse Trails (VHHT) are 68-Miles of Horse trails between Elk Garden and VA rt 94.  Featuring river crossings, valley views and mountain vistas!   Follow the orange blazes; however, some of them look dark orange/redish at times. 


Grayson Highlands State Park

Bridle trails: More than nine miles of bridle paths wander  through the park. These paths also lead to bridle trails in Jefferson  National Forest. Parking facilities for horse trailers are at the park  ( Key: F = Foot Traffic; H = Horseback Riding; B = Mountain Bikes; X = Cross Country Skiing )   GRAYSON TRAIL MAP

 

  • Horse Trail (east): mileage 3.2; H, F, B, X
  • Horse Trail (north): mileage 2.0; H, F, X
  • Seed Orchard Road: mileage 1.2; H, F, B, X
  • Old Upchurch Road: mileage 3.3; H, F, B, X


Virginia Creeper Trail

 From a historical perspective, the Creeper Trail is a fascinating  ride. The trail runs along a rail right-of-way that dates to the  industrial expansion across the US in the 1880s and the accompanying  iron ore speculation that ran even southward down to the western portion  of Virginia.  The Creeper Trail is open to bikers, hikers and  horseback riders. There are several places to park horse trailers while  you enjoy a great ride.  Other parking areas at the trailhead in Abingdon,  Alvarado, Green Cove, Straight Branch, Whitetop and Creek Junction.  

VA CREEPER TRAIL MAPS CLICK HERE


New River Trail State Park

A Rails to Trails" project,  New River Trail is a 57-mile linear park that follows an abandoned  railroad right-of-way,  winds through and parallels the scenic and historic New River for 39 miles and passes through Grayson, Carroll, Wythe and Pulaski counties in southwestern Virginia and the city of Galax. The trail's gentle slope makes it great for visitors of all ages  to hike, bike and ride horseback.   There are many different access points along the trail, with the southern end beginning in Galax going 57 miles to the Town of Pulaski in  the New River Valley.  There are access points to the trail at Allisonia, Chestnut Yard,  Cliffview, Dannelly Park (near Galax), Draper, Dora Junction (near  Pulaski), Foster Falls, Fries, Galax, Gambetta, Hiwassee and Ivanhoe.  Horse trailer parking is available at Allisonia, Austinville, Cliffview,  Dora Junction, Draper, Fries, Ivanhoe and the Mark E. Hufeisen Horse  Complex.  NEW RIVER TRAIL MAP CLICK HERE

 

  • Two tunnels: 135 feet and 193 feet long
  • Three major bridges: Hiwassee - 951 feet; Ivanhoe - 670 feet; Fries Junction - 1,089 feet
  • Nearly 30 smaller bridges and trestles
  • A historic shot tower used more than 200 years ago to make ammunition
  • Potable water is available only at Galax, Cliffview Campground  (Dannelly Park) and Foster Falls as well as at the horse trailer lots at  Ivanhoe, Draper and Dora Junction.
  • Five non-flush toilets are available along the trail.


Facilities

 After a long day of trail riding on the stunning mountains of Southwest Virginia your horse deserves a good nights rest.  We provide a peaceful safe place for you and your steed to rest your heads.  


  • Main Stable

6 stalls that are 12x12

  • White Barn

4 stalls that are 12x12 w/attached 15x30 paddocks.  

  •  60' round pen. 


  • Neg Coggins Required
  • Current Vaccines Required
  • SHOES are recommended (or boots if barefoot - the mountains are mountainous terrain)

Find out more

Video crossing bridge on va creeper trail

Featuring "Addison"

Our Facility

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12x12 Stalls

At our main stable you will find 6 stalls that are all 12x12.  They have dutch outside doors and sliding doors in the hallway.  There is water in the barn and hitching posts out front.

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Stalls with Paddocks

In our lower white barn we have up to 4 stalls (depending on availabilty) that are matted 12x12 with attached dirt/sand paddocks that are 15x30.  Water and crossties are available in this barn

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Backcountry Horse Sense

Good health  and proper shots prevent diseases from spreading. Virginia State Law  requires that all horses must have proof of a negative Coggins Test  within the past year. Horses from other States must also have a valid  certificate of health. Recommended, but not required, inoculations are:  influenza, rhinopneumonitis, and eastern and western encephalitis.


Before going  out, make sure that your horse’s shoes are secure and that the animal  is sound on all four feet. If your horse’s respiration becomes jerky or  irregular while on the trail, stop and let it recover, then walk out.


Always hobble horses or tie them to a hitchline or picket line. NEVER  tie them to a tree, even for a few minutes. Camp and tether horses at  least 100 feet from streams or springs. Wash bodies and dishes well away  from streams & springs.


Always stay  on the trail. CUTTING ACROSS SWITCHBACKS IS ILLEGAL. Taking shortcuts  will quickly destroy the beauty you came to enjoy.  Equestrians  may use nearly every trail in the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area  (except where indicated as no horses) including those in wildernesses.  The major exception is the Appalachian National Scenic Trail which is  reserved for hikers only. A few other trails off limits to horses are  clearly signed. Please do not trespass on these trails. 


Pack it in, pack it out! This goes for food, drinks, gear, cigarettes and anything else you pack into the backcountry.  When  it has been unusually rainy, avoid using fragile trails — use hard  packed forest roads instead. Always practice Leave No Trace principles  while in the backcountry. Build only small campfires, use a stove for  cooking, and clean up after yourself.  Keep in mind that most  maintenance work on trails is done by volunteers. If you’d like to have  better trails, volunteer! There’s no finer way to maintain and improve  the good image of horseback riders than pitching in with trail  maintenance.